Posted in Monthly Reads, Recommendations, TBR, Year of the Asian Reading Challenge

January TBR

So it’s been January for a while now but finally here is my TBR post. It’s mostly some old books with a few new ones peppered in. I’m setting a modest goal for four ‘book’ books this month, and additional comics and graphic novels. I’m going to do another post on my comic and graphic novel TBR.

Tunnel of Bones (City of Ghosts #2)

Cassidy Blake’s and her corporally challenged best friend Jacob’s adventures pick up after their dangerous adventures in Scotland. Now they are in Paris, filming the next episode of Cassidy’s parents show The Inspecters. While Cassidy hopes Paris isn’t as haunted as Eninghburgh her hopes are dashed when she learns about the ghosts hiding beneath Paris in the Catacombs. 

And when Cassidy awakens a strong spirit from the Catacombs, she must rely on her growing skills as a ghost hunter, as well as new and old friends. Together they must solve a mystery before the spirit Cassidy unleashed becomes strong enough to be free to haunt Paris forever. 

Amazon: Tunnel of Bones

More to the Story

A retelling of Little Women set in a Pakistani American family. In this case, Jo is  Jameela Mirza who was just picked to be the feature editor in her middle school newspaper. Jameela wants to be an award-winning journalist like a late family member. The head editor keeps shooting down her ideas, and she finds herself writing about a new student, a boy with a British accent who keeps to himself. But how will she make this story engaging enough to win a national media contest?

But things get complicated when Jameela’s family is shaken up by her father taking an overseas job that takes him away from their Georgia home. Jameela, along with her three sisters aren’t sure what to do. Missing her father ignites a fire under Jameela, she’s going to write the best article ever and make her dad proud.

But when her younger sister gets seriously ill, Jameela has to decide what is really important. She has to make the same choice at school where her quest for fame might cost her a friend.

While trying to find out what matters most Jameela wonders whether she’s cut out to be a journalist after all.

Written by Pakistani-American writer Hena Khan.

Amazon: More to the Story

Lalani of the Distant Sea

I’ve really been enjoying this book because of its unique narrative structure. Lalani Sarita’s is just trying to get by Sanlagita where life is difficult and women aren’t valued. Whenever someone tries to leave the island they never come back, a fate that befell Lalani’s father. Lalani and her mother have to suffer from her stepfather and stepbrother. And deal with a drought that has hit the island.

When Lalani travels up the mountain the islanders think is evil, her wish is granted but not in the way she imagined. And when distress falls on the village, Lalani ends up shouldering the blame.

To help her mother who has fallen ill from an incurable disease, Lalani must leave the island to find the riches of the legendary Mount Isa, which towers on an island to the north. It holds what might be a cure for her mother and a way for Lalani to erase the mistakes she’s made in the village. But where generations of her people have failed to reach the island what chance does an ordinary girl have?

Amazon: Lalani of the Distant Sea

Peasprout Chen, Future Legend of Skate and Sword (Book 1)

A rural girl wants to win fame in the Pearl Famous Academy of Skate and Sword, where they teach the art of wu liu, the deadly and beautiful art of martial arts figure skating. Peasprout Chen and her brother Cricket are the first from a rural country in the country of Shin, to go to the famous school.

They soon find themselves in intense competition with the other students for the top spot at the Academy. But when trouble brews at the Academy, outsider Peasprout is blamed and must get to the bottom of the mystery to clear her name.

I’m also excited to read this as part of the Year of the Asian Readathon.

Amazon: Peasprout Chen

Photo by Bich Tran from Pexels

Posted in Recommendations, TBR, Year of the Asian Reading Challenge

Year of the Asian Reading Challenge TBR

Just a few of the books I’m looking forward to for my Year of the Asian Readathon. A lot of these are repeats from last year, but I’m making them a priority on my TBR this year.

1) The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi

I’ve been wanting to read this book for a while. This book deals with a girl coming to a new school after she comes to the United States from Korea. She feels like she has to change her name to fit in because her Korean name is too ‘different’ and hard for her class to pronounce.

So she has her class help her pick a new name but what will she decide to use for her name in the end?

2) Peasprout Chen Future Legend of Skate and Sword by Henry Lien

I’m working on this book right now and it’s very cute. It combines ice skating and martial arts. A girl and her brother from a rural country head to a famous school and must make a name for themselves.

Amazon: Peasprout Chen

3) Front Desk by Kelly Yang

This book was one of my favorites of 2018. If not my very favorite and the chance to give it a re-read is one I’m not passing up. It’s about Mia Tang and her family who come from China with big dreams and end up running a motel for a corrupt boss. When a chance for Mia to make her family’s dreams come up in the form of a writing contest, will she be able to make their American Dream happen?

Amazon: Front Desk

4)The Way To Bea

I picked this up last year but just didn’t get around to reading it. Beatrix Lee is going through a lot of changes as 7th grade rolls around. Everything from becoming a big sister to losing friends. Bea finds solace in the written word and learns who she wants to be with the help of poetry and a new group of friends.

Amazon: Way to Bea

I’m also planning to read a few graphic novels by Asian authors the first of which is:

5)NewsPrints

An orphan girl disguises herself as a boy so she can deliver newspapers. Set in a fictional country with 1920’s esque technology. Blue finds herself in the middle of some important secrets and makes a new friend who isn’t what he seems. But when authorities come looking for her new friend, will Blue with the help of a renegade scientist and some of her friends from the paper be able to get them out of trouble before they are drawn up into a larger conflict.

This will be mostly a re-read as well, but I never got around to finishing it. I’m also hoping to read the second book, Endgames which came out last year.

Amazon: NewsPrints

Are you participating in any reading challenges this year?

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Challenges, TBR, Year of the Asian Reading Challenge

Year of The Asian Reading Challenge 2020

I’m so glad YARC is back. This fell by the wayside in 2019 so I’m excited to give it another shot. This challenge focuses on reading books written by Asian authors. I also came in late last year so that didn’t help.

yarc header

This challenge is put on by the wonderful, CW from The Quiet PondShealea from Shut Up, Shealea, and Vicky from Vicky Who Reads!

The challenge has different levels, which is something I really like, it allows you to commit to what level you think you’ll be able to meet. The levels also have cute animal mascots as pictured above, and range from 1-10 books to more than 50 books.

I’m trying for the first level this cute little Philippine tarsier for reading 1 to 10 books. But I hope to read beyond that but on the note of just trying to have fun and not be stressed I’m going to stick with this little guy and then see if I surprise myself.

badge_tarsier

Please join me and many other bloggers if you haven’t already by signing up on any of the host blogs above. I’ll post more about some of the books of my TBR on Monday

Posted in TBR

New Years Reading Goals

Happy belated New Year everyone? Have you already finished some books? I just went to the library and got a ton of new books and books I need to finish from previous years. This year I wanted to set some new goals. Hopefully, things that will make me a more efficient reader and blogger and just let me have more fun with my blog and IG work.

1) Read 50 books this year.

That’s double the goal that I accomplished last year. However, I’m going to work on not DNFing so much, or if I’m not going to finish something, not finishing it early and moving on. However, I’m not going to be hard on myself if I don’t meet the goal and allow the fact that life happens throughout the year.

2)Be more active on Twitter and IG.

I want to be more active in the community. It will not only help the blog but it will be fun. I’m wanting to take part in more challenges and maybe events across blogs.

3) Stay active on the blog

I took a big break from the blog last year, I’m going to try to be active all year and see where it gets me.

4) Improve my photo quality on IG.

I’m going to try to put more thought and work into my shots. I tend to fall back on a certain format for photos and I want to show more variety.

5) Keep better track of the books I’m reading.

I’m planning to use a physical book tracker as well as a lovely spreadsheet from Kal over at Reader Voracious. The spreadsheet can be found here.  Kal @ Reader Voracious Book Spreadsheet

6) Purge my TBR

I have plenty of physical books sitting around that I haven’t read. I plan to either read them this year or get rid of them.

Photo by Evie Shaffer from Pexels

 

 

Posted in Recommendations, TBR

January New Releases

I’m probably a mood reader. But there are certain things coming out in January I’m excited about. I’m trying to include as many #OwnVoices pieces as possible. Special thanks to Book Birds for their list of January 2020 releases.

1)Brave. Black. First.: 50+ African American Women Who Changed the World

Published in partnership with curators from the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. This book is also sold as a series of postcards. It highlights important Black women who have shaped American culture.

Cheryl Willis Hudson is vice president and editorial director of Just Us Books, an independent publisher of black-interest books for children and young adults.

Erin K. Robinson is a Black illustrator based in Brooklyn. You can find her at brooklyndolly.com

Amazon: Brave. Black. First.

The book is out on January 7th.

2)Diana: Princess of the Amazons

A cute graphic novel take on Wonder Woman by some of my favorite authors Shannon Hale and Dean Hale. Diana is the only kid on an island full of adults, she’s mostly happy with her life, but she’d really like a friend her own age. Will her attempts to make a new friend cause more trouble than she expected?

Illustrated by Victoria Ying who is an author and artist living in Los Angeles, and has done work on Disney films including Frozen, Wreck-it Ralph and Moana.

Out on January 7th.

Amazon: Diana Princess of the Amazons

3) The Oldest Student: How Mary Walker Learned to Read

The Oldest Student: How Mary Walker Learned to Read by Rita Lorraine Hubbard

This picture book covers the life of Mary Walker, who learned to read at the age of 116.

The author Rita Lorraine Hubbard is the author of a number of nonfiction books for young adults and runs the children’s book review site Picture Book Depot. She also runs the historical site The Black History Channel.

The illustrator Oge Mora has been honored for her work with 2019 Caldecott Honor Book for her book, Thank You Omu. The book also won 2019, Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award. 

Amazon: The Oldest Student:How Mary Walker Learned to Read

Out January 7th.

4)Scavenge the Stars

This gender-swapped retelling of The Count of Monte Cristo sounds super interesting. After being held captive for years on a debtor’s ship all Amaya wants is revenge against the man who ruined her family and destroyed the life she once had. When she rescues a man from drowning, he offers Amaya a chance at a new identity and revenge, but the path to her revenge is more complicated than it seems, and she must figure out who she can trust, or if she can trust anyone at all?

Tara Sim is a YA author who is based in the Bay Area.

Out January 7th.

Amazon: Scavenge the Stars

5)Stella Diaz Never Gives Up

The next book in the Stella Diaz series, after Stella Diaz Has Something to Say Stella Diaz is a shy Mexican-American girl who is excited to take her family vacation to Mexico. She’s most excited to see the sea-life, but after she sees the state of the ocean, she realizes she has to do something to help.

But what can she do? She knows it will be a lot of hard work, but with lots of help from new and old friends, she will find a way to help, because Stella Diaz never gives up. 

From award-winning author Mexican American author, Angela Dominguez.

Out January 20th.

Amazon: Stella Diaz Never Gives Up

What are you guys excited for this January?

Posted in Monthly Reads, TBR

December TBR

While I plan to add in a few new things December is going to be mostly about finishing up my TBR from the last couple of months and trying to hit my yearly book goal. I only have three more books to go so it would be nice to exceed it as well.

Continuing TBR

Tunnel of Bones (City of Ghosts #2)

Cassidy Blake’s and her corporally challenged best friend Jacob’s adventures pick up after their dangerous adventures in Scotland. Now they are in Paris, filming the next episode of Cassidy’s parents show The Inspecters. While Cassidy hopes Paris isn’t as haunted as Eninghburgh her hopes are dashed when she learns about the ghosts hiding beneath Paris in the Catacombs. 

And when Cassidy awakens a strong spirit from the Catacombs, she must rely on her growing skills as a ghost hunter, as well as new and old friends. Together they must solve a mystery before the spirit Cassidy unleashed becomes strong enough to be free to haunt Paris forever. 

Amazon: Tunnel of Bones

More to the Story

A retelling of Little Women set in a Pakistani American family. In this case, Jo is  Jameela Mirza who was just picked to be the feature editor in her middle school newspaper. Jameela wants to be an award-winning journalist like a late family member. The head editor keeps shooting down her ideas, and she finds herself writing about a new student, a boy with a British accent who keeps to himself. But how will she make this story engaging enough to win a national media contest?

But things get complicated when Jameela’s family is shaken up by her father taking an overseas job that takes him away from their Georgia home. Jameela, along with her three sisters aren’t sure what to do. Missing her father ignites a fire under Jameela, she’s going to write the best article ever and make her dad proud.

But when her younger sister gets seriously ill, Jameela has to decide what is really important. She has to make the same choice at school where her quest for fame might cost her a friend.

While trying to find out what matters most Jameela wonders whether she’s cut out to be a journalist after all.

Written by Pakistani-American writer Hena Khan.

Amazon: More to the Story

Lalani of the Distant Sea

I’ve really been enjoying this book because of its unique narrative structure. Lalani Sarita’s is just trying to get by Sanlagita where life is difficult and women aren’t valued. Whenever someone tries to leave the island they never come back, a fate that befell Lalani’s father. Lalani and her mother have to suffer from her stepfather and stepbrother. And deal with a drought that has hit the island.

When Lalani travels up the mountain the islanders think is evil, her wish is granted but not in the way she imagined. And when distress falls on the village, Lalani ends up shouldering the blame.

To help her mother who has fallen ill from an incurable disease, Lalani must leave the island to find the riches of the legendary Mount Isa, which towers on an island to the north. It holds what might be a cure for her mother and a way for Lalani to erase the mistakes she’s made in the village. But where generations of her people have failed to reach the island what chance does an ordinary girl have?

Amazon: Lalani and the Distant Sea

New TBR

The Tenth Girl

While trying to escape the political forces that killed her mother, Mavi finds herself at a strange boarding school on the tip of South America. Despite having misgivings about the strange school Mavi tries to fit in. Despite the fact that she’s told not to roam at night and threatened by a mysterious man.

But Mavi can’t let the otherness go, when ten of her students go missing and teachers and students alike began to behave like they are possessed. Is Mavi in over her head, or do the mysterious secrets which will longer be ignored have more to do with Mavi than she wants to admit?

Amazon: The Tenth Girl

Remarkables

Marin can see mysterious children/teens she calls the “The Remarkables” one second they are there and the next they aren’t. She thinks she’s the only one who can see them, but when she meets someone else who can see them, he warns her to stay away.

But can Marin and her new friend and their connection with the “The Remarkables” somehow prevent a disaster before it happens? Will by saving the past will they be able to stop the pain that occurred for them in the future?

Amazon: The Remarkables

I’m trying to be reasonable about the number of books I take on this month and try to finish them, instead of starting and not finishing a lot. What about you, what’s on your TBR?

 

Posted in TBR

Year of the Asian Reading Challenge TBR

I’ve come to accept that I’m more of a mood reader than anything, so my TBR is more of some book I might like to revisit or read during the next couple of months.

Children’s Books

The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi

I’ve been wanting to read this book for a while. This book deals with a girl coming to a new school after she comes to the United States from Korea. She feels like she has to change her name to fit in because her Korean name is too ‘different’ and hard for her class to pronounce.

So she has her class help her pick a new name but what will she decide to use for her name in the end?

Middle Grade

Peasprout Chen Future Legend of Skate and Sword by Henry Lien

This graphic novel sounds amazing. It’s about a new girl from a small town going to a famous school of ice skating and martial arts and trying to make a name for herself. I can’t wait.

 

Front Desk by Kelly Yang

This book was one of my favorite’s last year. If not my very favorite and the chance to give it a re-read is one I’m not passing up. It’s about Mia Tang and her family who come from China with big dreams and end up running a motel for a corrupt boss. When a chance for Mia to make her family’s dreams come up in the form of a writing contest, will she be able to make their American Dream happen?

Spirit Hunters by Ellen Oh

Book cover showing a haunted house.

This one looks like it’s going to be a creepy read and I love ghost/spooky/horror but not too horror stories.

YA Books 

Shadow of the Fox by Julie Kagawa

I’ve never read Julie Kagawa but have always wanted to, I plan to look into her Talon Saga if I’m a fan of this one.

The Place Between Breaths by An Na

As a schizophrenic blogger, this had to be on the list from the moment I heard about it. It’s about a girl dealing with the after-effects of her mother’s schizophrenia and the possibility of her own and honestly, I can’t wait to read it!

The Young Elites by Marie Lu

young-elites-cover

I enjoy Marie Lu’s writing style from what I’ve read. The thing is I haven’t set aside the time to read much of it. Other than picking up Legend and putting it down I really haven’t gotten enough exposure to her to make a judgment. I’d like to read as much of her work as I can starting with The Young Elites because I like the premise, then maybe working my way back to Legend.

We Hunt the Flame by Hafsah Faizal

I’ve been looking forward to this book for months. It’s a really interesting story that covers identity, finding your true self, magic, and is set in a world inspired by ancient Arabia. Plus one of the main characters sounds super cool.

Not Your Sidekick by CB Lee

Not Your Sidekick (Sidekick Squad, #1)

I found the book recommended for YARC, and it looks really good. It’s about a biracial Vietnamese-Chinese bisexual girl without powers in a world where everyone has superpowers. I’m also loving the bi representation. This one looks like it’s going to be really interesting and also has a cool looking sequel.

I’m looking forward to challenging myself to read more Asian Authors for the rest of the year.